workplace culture

/Tag:workplace culture

The massive risk of good cultures

An article from our Cultural Intelligence newsletter…

We were running a culture workshop a while back and it was clear the group, consisting of staff and leaders, was highly involved. As we focused on an issue that emerged from our UGRs Stock Take (a tool that identifies the real culture of a workplace) one staff member (let’s call him Graeme) shared a view with the entire group that was clearly difficult for him.

The silver bullet of workplace cultures

An article from our Cultural Intelligence newsletter…

It can be argued that the topic of workplace culture has never been hotter. From crises within sporting teams to integrity issues within organisations, so many problems are positioned as ‘cultural’ issues.

That’s brought with it volumes of research and opinion as to what is needed to fix these cultural challenges.

History tells us that the vast majority of these so called ‘solutions’

How can you make it safe for people to speak up?

This is a question we received from a client recently. In this case, it’s pretty obvious that the person is concerned that some people in the team have things to say, but are choosing not to – for reasons we’ll outline below.

Our starting point however is to say that some leaders might say they would like others to speak up, but deep down they are glad these people stay silent.

Introducing a corporate culture ‘band of tolerance’​…

An article from our Cultural Intelligence newsletter…

We were recently having a conversation around the notion of a price-related band of tolerance. Our view is that for items we purchase there is a band of tolerance – a price range that we’ll tolerate when deciding to purchase a product or service. For most things we consider purchasing, too low a price will scare us off, as will too high a price.

Where is the strategic thinking?

An article from our Cultural Intelligence newsletter…

There is little doubt that leaders nowadays are much more attuned to the need to understand and improve their workplace culture. More and more, leaders realise that their culture can be a single point of difference that can yield incredible results.

Kmart in Australia and New Zealand is a classic example of this. From having literally lost money for 10 consecutive years,

How to get people passionate about change

It’s strange in many respects that in this era, when there is and has been so much change happening, people are so resistant to organisational change.

So how do you get people passionate about change? The straight answer to this is – you don’t! Not all of them any way.

Let’s face it – we all have different experiences and different DNA and for some people, being ‘passionate’ is not part of their make-up!

So the bottom line is that not all people will get passionate about change.