leadership

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The massive risk of good cultures

An article from our Cultural Intelligence newsletter…

We were running a culture workshop a while back and it was clear the group, consisting of staff and leaders, was highly involved. As we focused on an issue that emerged from our UGRs Stock Take (a tool that identifies the real culture of a workplace) one staff member (let’s call him Graeme) shared a view with the entire group that was clearly difficult for him.

The silver bullet of workplace cultures

An article from our Cultural Intelligence newsletter…

It can be argued that the topic of workplace culture has never been hotter. From crises within sporting teams to integrity issues within organisations, so many problems are positioned as ‘cultural’ issues.

That’s brought with it volumes of research and opinion as to what is needed to fix these cultural challenges.

History tells us that the vast majority of these so called ‘solutions’

True insights into culture and service leadership

An article from our Cultural Intelligence newsletter…

In the article below, Steve writes about his latest experiences across multiple car dealerships – and what he learned!

I’ve recently purchased a new car – and learned lots in the process about aspects to culture and service that I hadn’t expected to learn!

When I first began looking for a car, I thought I’d be better off purchasing a demonstrator model.

How can you make it safe for people to speak up?

This is a question we received from a client recently. In this case, it’s pretty obvious that the person is concerned that some people in the team have things to say, but are choosing not to – for reasons we’ll outline below.

Our starting point however is to say that some leaders might say they would like others to speak up, but deep down they are glad these people stay silent.

Introducing a corporate culture ‘band of tolerance’​…

An article from our Cultural Intelligence newsletter…

We were recently having a conversation around the notion of a price-related band of tolerance. Our view is that for items we purchase there is a band of tolerance – a price range that we’ll tolerate when deciding to purchase a product or service. For most things we consider purchasing, too low a price will scare us off, as will too high a price.

The BIG problem with developing leaders

An article from our Cultural Intelligence newsletter…

We were in a private conversation with a couple of senior executives after having worked with the organisation’s leaders over a full day.

One of the senior execs reflected on how delighted he was with regard to the processes and outcomes from day. He then went on to bemoan the large investment in leadership training that had been implemented by the organisation for little or no return.

Does culture come down to one thing?

An article from our Cultural Intelligence newsletter…

It would be interesting to track over the years the extent to which the term ‘organisational culture’ (or one of its variations) was used in the media and business-related articles. Our guess is that we’d see almost an exponential rise in its use over the last few years.

It seems every corporate scandal is attributed to a poor workplace culture.

The latest we noticed was is the Origonian online newspaper,

Where is the strategic thinking?

An article from our Cultural Intelligence newsletter…

There is little doubt that leaders nowadays are much more attuned to the need to understand and improve their workplace culture. More and more, leaders realise that their culture can be a single point of difference that can yield incredible results.

Kmart in Australia and New Zealand is a classic example of this. From having literally lost money for 10 consecutive years,

How to get people passionate about change

It’s strange in many respects that in this era, when there is and has been so much change happening, people are so resistant to organisational change.

So how do you get people passionate about change? The straight answer to this is – you don’t! Not all of them any way.

Let’s face it – we all have different experiences and different DNA and for some people, being ‘passionate’ is not part of their make-up!

So the bottom line is that not all people will get passionate about change.

Why people don’t show initiative

In March 1964, a woman named Kitty Genovese was stabbed in front of her New York apartment. As it transpired, around 40 people either heard her screams, or watched the brutal event from their apartment window. Police first learned about the attack 35 minutes after it had begun.

The public were outraged not only by yet another murder in the city, but by the facts that it took so long for the police to be notified, and that no one had the courage to try to intervene.

Does Your Workplace Have UGRs?

Want to understand your culture? Understand the UGRs…

Most of us have been to a meeting where, upon conclusion, the real meetings begin. Typically, people reconvene in smaller groups to canvass a range of issues that can include displeasure at a decision that has been made, lamenting the attitudes of one or more people who were at the meeting, or planning a strategy to work around a particular outcome.

It’s often the case that those most vocal after the meeting are least likely to have spoken up during the meeting.

Management Matters – When Silence Ain’t Golden

Using or condoning ‘the silent treatment’ is unforgivable in any worker, let alone a leader.

One of the true stars of the game of Australian Rules Football is former Geelong player, Gary Ablett. In 2009, Ablett won the Brownlow medal, which is the highest accolade for an individual in the sport.

During the 2010 season there was huge conjecture as to whether Ablett would re-sign a contract with Geelong. This was despite the team having been extremely successful.